GLSP HONORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR PHYLLIS J. HOLMEN AT ITS 4TH BIENNIAL CHAMPIONS OF JUSTICE RECOGNITION EVENT!

http://www.ihssbca.org/blog/?edu=thesis-centre-dublin Join GLSP’s supporters and friends for an evening in celebration of Phyllis Holmen’s 43 years of public service and outstanding achievements on Thursday, January 25, 2018, from 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., at the State Bar Conference Center (Atlanta). Contribution levels are: Attorneys $50, Younger Lawyers $30, and Friends of GLSP $20. To make your contribution, click here and designate Champions of Justice Event. All contributions are due by January 19, 2018. For information on sponsorships, contact GLSP’s development office at 404-563-7710, ext. 1611. Sponsorships are due by January 5, 2018. Thank you for your support!

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Using the law to stop the violence—and save taxpayers money

go here When Sandra (not her real name), a single mother of two young kids, decided to let her children stay with their grandmother for a couple of weeks over the summer to save on childcare costs, she didn’t realize the consequences that would bring. Her abusive ex-husband and the father of the children responded to this news with violent threats that made Sandra fear for her family’s safety—threats to kidnap their children and even to kill Sandra. A Georgia Legal Services attorney helped Sandra get a temporary protective order against him, and the incessant calls and threats stopped completely. Sandra can once again live in peace, focusing on taking care of herself and her kids.

conservation of energy sources essays As an attorney at Georgia Legal Services, I’ve heard many people question the benefits of a temporary protective order. A temporary protective order is more than just a piece of paper. Studies show that temporary protective orders have a one in two chance of ending the abuse altogether for the victim. For those who continue to experience violence by their abuser following the protective order, over time, the violence stops or is significantly reduced, according to a Department of Justice study.

follow url Having a lawyer increases the chances that a victim of domestic violence can obtain a temporary protective order. The free civil legal services provided by Georgia Legal Services to domestic violence victims protects victims from further violence. Our society benefits, too, according to The Institute for Policy Integrity, which found that “the benefits to be gained by subsidizing more legal services can often justify their costs.”  For every $1 spent for civil legal services to obtain a protective order for domestic violence victims, $30 in public costs are saved.

enter One in four women in the US become victims of severe physical violence at the hands of their intimate partner according to the Centers for Disease Control. Domestic violence not only has incalculable costs to the victims and their families, but to the community as well. The CDC estimates that domestic violence costs the US over $9 billion each year in medical costs, law enforcement, social services, and more. Georgia Legal Services has obtained millions of dollars in economic benefits for victims, and has set high goals to shape the national narrative around family violence away from victim-blaming and toward supportive, holistic, results-oriented solutions.

thesis database university of toronto Call Georgia Legal Services at 1-800-498-9469 or visit us at www.glsp.org and click on Donate Now to make a contribution. Georgia Legal Services is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation with a mission to provide civil legal services for persons with low incomes, creating equal access to justice and opportunities out of poverty.  

see url Vicky Kimbrell
Family Violence Project Director
Georgia Legal Services Program

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State Policy Change Impacts Food Stamps

http://www.fcn.unp.edu.ar/fcn/?read=how-to-write-a-thesis-proposal&id=3 Because  of changes in policy, SNAP (food stamp) benefits may be reduced.  This general reduction is not based on a change in your income or circumstances, but in state policy. If you have monthly medical bills over $185 and have a disabled or senior person in your household or over $354 in utility bills, you can ask for a re-calculation of your individual SNAP (food stamp) budget at DFCS.  You must be able to provide  verification.

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GLSP Press Statement on Federally Funded Health Care

here 1.7 million people in Georgia received Medicaid coverage as of April this year—and the majority of them are children. That’s 17 percent of the state’s population, or nearly one in five people. Georgia spent less in Medicaid expenditures on each enrollee than the national average—$3,916 versus the $5,563 spent nationally. Because of this, under the Senate-proposed healthcare bill, Georgia likely would have received a lower per capita amount than states that expanded Medicaid or spent more per person.

african history essay to buy If the fallout from Congress’ not-yet-determined decision on health care results in cuts to Medicaid, how will the state decide who can’t receive that assistance?

http://www.ihssbca.org/blog/?edu=quotations-of-co-education-essay Will it be the 69-year-old intellectually and physically disabled woman who is only able to remain in her home by receiving home and community-based services provided with Medicaid funds? Without those services this woman, whose case is like so many of the clients I represent, would be required to live in a nursing home, which she could not afford on her $760 Social Security retirement income.

http://www.fcn.unp.edu.ar/fcn/?read=acknowledgement-thesis-by-group&id=3 Or will the state deny someone like 65-year-old Mr. Jones, who was recently approved for Nursing Home Medicaid, when his dementia makes him unable to live safely independently in the community? Mr. Jones draws Social Security benefits of $1,023 per month and pays $973 per month to the nursing home–leaving him $50 to pay for essentials not provided by the facility. Medicaid pays approximately $4,300 per month for his care.

should boys learn to cook free essay Or perhaps a five-year-old severely disabled child will be denied the Medicaid assistance that allows her to receive nursing services in her home while her parents work? Shall the parents stop working to provide for the child’s round-the-clock care, or should the child be placed in an institution?

http://www.fcn.unp.edu.ar/fcn/?read=baby-thesis-titles-engineering&id=3 These examples all represent cases that have been handled by Georgia Legal Services Program in the past and likely will be in the future. They represent the very difficult choices that Georgia will have to make in the coming years if significant cuts to Medicaid are made.

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GLSP Recognizes Elder Abuse Awareness Month

http://www.fcn.unp.edu.ar/fcn/?read=t-hypothesis&id=3 enter site June is elder abuse awareness month. Our attorneys were featured in the media to speak out about the prevalence of elder abuse, and ways Georgia Legal Services Program can help seniors.

Robert Bush, a supervising attorney in Savannah, was on the statewide Georgia Public Broadcasting’s morning radio show, On Second Thought. Listen to the segment on the GPB website here.

Tomieka Daniel, managing attorney in Macon, wrote the below op-ed published in Elijay’s Times-Courier:

An estimated 5 million, or 1 in 10, older Americans are abused or neglected each year, according to the U.S. Administration on Aging. June is Elder Abuse Awareness Month.

 “I regularly see elderly clients that are taken advantage of by their loved ones or others around them—their homes taken, finances threatened, emotional well-being shattered. People don’t realize how at risk elderly people really are,” says Tomieka R. Daniel, Managing Attorney in the Georgia Legal Services office in Macon.

Elders who are abused are twice as likely to be hospitalized, four times as likely to go into nursing homes and three times as likely to die, according to World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. “While most abusers are family members, trusted professionals and complete strangers may also target older adults,” a World Elder Abuse Awareness Day press statement states.

At Georgia Legal Services our attorneys help seniors protect themselves against such abuse, whether it be physical, emotional, financial, or otherwise. We’ve assisted with temporary protective orders to create safe environments for elderly clients in abusive situations. We’ve helped with evictions from apartments and nursing homes.  And we’ve saved clients hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical debts by enrolling them in the healthcare insurance programs.

In honor of Elder Abuse Awareness Month, we at Georgia Legal Services want to make it known that we’re here to help. For more information, call 1-800-498-9469 or apply online at www.glsp.org. . To report abuse, neglect, or exploitation of an older adult, please call 1-866-55AGING (1-866-552-4464) – Press “3”. For help with benefits, including Medicaid or food stamps, call our Benefits Hotline at 1-888-632-6332.

 

 

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Fact Sheet: Cuts To Medicaid Would Harm Georgia

The changes to Medicaid that Congress is currently considering would have a significant impact on our clients.  click here Medicaid funding is essential to delivering care in rural areas. The National Health Law Program and the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families put together source url this fact sheet outlining the effects such changes would have on Georgia. (Citations are included in the attachment.)

Here are a few highlights:

Medicaid caps

  1. follow link Cuts to Medicaid will jeopardize Georgia’s ability to provide health care to children, seniors, and people with disabilities. The proposed caps under the AHCA would effectively cut $4 billion of federal funding for Georgia over a ten-year period, shifting these costs to the state.
  2. follow site Caps on Medicaid funding would blow a hole in Georgia’s budget. Georgia’s Medicaid budget relies heavily on federal funding, comprising 49.2% of total federal funds to the state. Federal funding of Medicaid frees up state funding for schools, workforce development, transportation, and public safety.
  3. proofreading dialogue worksheet Priority health initiatives in Georgia go are at risk if Medicaid funding is capped. Medicaid funding is essential to delivering care in rural areas.  Medicaid funding helps people who need long term care, like seniors and people with disabilities, stay in their homes and communities and out of nursing facilities. Medicaid funding allows 968,300 women and girls in Georgia to obtain the health care they need throughout their lives. Medicaid is the primary source of funding for treatment services for people with mental illness and substance abuse disorders.

 

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Bringing To Light a Costly Error for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities

This year, like last year, we put together a public service announcement about a recurring DFCS computer glitch that kicks seniors and disabled Georgians off of Medicare Savings Programs. DFCS computers can’t update their systems with the annual cost-of-living adjustments until April.  This means that people who get help paying their Medicare premiums receive notices that their assistance will be cut off because their incomes are suddenly too high. DFCS reports that they manually update their files, but this leaves our clients frightened by the erroneous notices and at risk of believing they are no longer eligible and losing the benefit altogether.

Last year our public service announcement turned into an Augusta Chronicle article. We had at least 30 seniors call in one day for help.  In addition, some seniors who were unaware of the benefit at all find out about these programs from the public service announcement and enroll for the first time with our help.

This year the announcement was posted in papers across the state and mentioned on Georgia Public Broadcasting, which has coverage statewide. A 95-year-old woman read our notice in the Greensboro Herald Journal in a small town of 3,500. Prior to reading our article, she did not know she was eligible for the Medicare Savings Program-but after calling our Benefits Hotline, we helped her enroll in that benefit, which will save her over $5600 per year, as well as food stamp assistance.

Fran Montelaro is the Benefits Hotline paralegal who helped this client, who Fran remembers being “extremely humbled and excited” upon finding out about this program. “For me, it means speaking to someone as if she would be me at 95 years old and being treated with kindness and empathy.” Fran was recently referred to at a national aging conference in DC as the “client whisperer” because of her extraordinary abilities to relate to and solve her clients’ problems.

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Free Veterans Workshop

Join us this Friday, April 28, in Waycross click from 12 to 3 p.m at the Waycross City Auditorium, 865 Pendleton Street. thesis for global warming essay  The workshop includes free legal services arranged by Georgia Legal Services and the State Bar of Georgia as a part of Ask a Lawyer Day.  Georgia Legal Services staff will assist veterans to access benefits for which they could potentially be eligible. Spouses and dependents of the veterans may qualify for benefits as well. State and local agencies will be on hand advise veterans and their family members about the resources that are available locally. Download the flyer here.

veterans

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