GLSP housing case in Augusta newspaper Metrospirit

A low-income apartment building in Augusta is the focus of a case in which GLSP attorney David Bartholomew represents a man whose apartment was so badly damaged by a fire that he could no longer live there. The owners of the apartment building failed to repair the damage, then tried to evict the tenant.

READ MORE …

http://metrospirit.com/eyes-richmond-summit/

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WSB-TV story on GLSP’s Henry County school discrimination case

WSB Television aired a story about GLSP’s complaint of racial discrimination against a 12-year-old African American girl who was threatened with expulsion and criminal charges because she wrote the word “Hi” on a locker room wall. The white student who was with her was not punished nearly as severely. The complaint to the federal Office of Civil Rights claims that there is a pattern of such disciplinary discrimination in Henry County.

CLICK HERE to see the report.

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GLSP’s Hodson Award gets statewide press

Newspapers around the state have written stories about Georgia Legal Services Program winning the American Bar Association’s Hodson Award for Public Service. Below are links to some of the articles:

The Daily Report, July 7, 2014

The Henry County Herald, July 23, 2014

The Gainesville Times

The Bartow County Daily Tribune

The Athens Banner Herald

The Dalton Times Free Press

The Albany Herald

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GLSP, State Bar campaign exceeds goal

Holmen and check

State Bar President Charles Ruffin presents check to GLSP Executive Director Phyllis Holmen

GLSP’s recent campaign through the State Bar of Georgia has surpassed its fundraising goal by netting $554,299.

“We are so pleased to see growing support among the private bar,” said Executive Director Phyllis Holmen.

Donations to the State Bar “And Justice for All” campaign come from individual lawyers around the state who either write individual checks or opt in to a GLSP donation through their State Bar dues payment. The funds were presented to Holmen by State Bar President Charles Ruffin at the Bar convention in Amelia Island, Florida in June.

“It is gratifying to see lawyers across the state write checks to support civil legal services for the poor,” said Holmen.  The Bar campaign represents less than five percent of GLSP’s total budget, but is the way the organization connects with Georgia lawyers who believe in supporting civil legal aid. Many state lawyers also support GLSP by volunteering to represent low-income clients pro bono.

Most of GLSP’s funding comes from grants from the Legal Services Corporation, which is funded by Congress and supports legal aid organizations across the country. Other GLSP funding comes from contracts through the Older Americans Act, as well as grants from the Judicial Council of Georgia, the Georgia Bar Foundation, the State Bar of Georgia Pro Bono Project, the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council, the Georgia Legal Services Foundation, the National Council on Aging, various fundraising events and others.

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Fund to support GLSP fellows from Emory Law

As former GLSP board President Aaron Buchsbaum neared the end of his life, his family sought ways to honor the institutions that had meant so much to him. Georgia Legal Services Program was one of those institutions. With the establishment of the Aaron L. Buchsbaum Fellowship Fund, based on a gift of $650,000 from Buchsbaum and his wife Esther, a recent Emory Law graduate will be chosen every other year to receive funding to work as a fellow at GLSP for a year.

Read more from Emory Lawyer magazine: CLICK HERE

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GLSP lawyers talk about family violence on 121 radio stations

Family Law Specialist Vicky Kimbrell and Senior Staff Attorney Wingo Smith of the Piedmont office were invited to do a talk radio show on Clear Channel, which provides content to 121 radio stations across Georgia. Kimbrell and Smith talked about how GLSP can help victims of domestic violence and how our lawyers are trying to improve how DV cases are handled by law enforcement officials and the courts across the state.

To hear the radio show, CLICK HERE…

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